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Our work, which often draws inspiration from the mundane, has been featured in various media, perhaps  because it deals with the everyday world around us, which while familiar is not always understood ! A quote by the English lexicographer and man of letters, Samuel Johnson (1709-84) may be apt: “Vulgar and inactive minds confound familiarity with knowledge, and conceive themselves informed of the whole nature of things when they are shown their form or told their use.”

Read an article by scientist and author Philip Ball on everyday science titled Foams of Fancy in Nature Materials. Or read the Boston Globe editorial titled Why ? which was also reprinted as an editorial titled Let’s go on asking why in the International Herald Tribune. And an article by mathematician Gilbert Strang of MIT titled A remarkable eye for out-of-the-ordinary mathematics published in the applied mathematics newsletter SIAM News. Our work has also inspired artist Jonathon Nix ; paintings from a recent exhibition include the Mahadevan Series. And recently science journalist and author Giselle Weiss wrote an article titled Das ratsel des zerknullten papiers for the Swiss newspaper NZZ.


A Scientist Who Delights in the Mundane - Oct 2020

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From crumpled paper to termite mounds to three-sided coins, L. Mahadevan has turned the whole world into his laboratory.


Life from chaos - May 2020

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Researchers use geometry and dynamics to better understand tissue organization.

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Dynamic morphoskeletons in development. M. Serra, S. Streichan, M. Chuai, C. J. Weijer, and L. Mahadevan, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (2020) vol. 117 | no. 21, 11444–11449. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

A better understanding of soft artificial muscles - Nov 2019

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Research sheds light on the underlying mechanics of soft filaments

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Topology, geometry and mechanics of strongly stretched and twisted filaments: solenoids, plectonemes, and artificial muscle fibers. N. Charles, M. Gazzola, L. Mahadevan Phys. Rev. Lett. (2020), 123, 208003. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

The shape-shifting of things to come - Oct 2019

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Complex lattices that change in response to stimuli open a range of applications in electronics, robotics, medicine

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Growth patterns for shape-shifting elastic bilayers W. M. van Rees, E. Vouga, and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 2017. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Shape-shifting structured lattices via multimaterial 4D printing. J.W. Boley, W.M. van Rees, C. Lissandrello, M.N. Horenstein, R.L. Truby, A. Kotikian, J.A. Lewis, and L. MahadevanProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Oct 2019, 116 (42) 20856-20862, 2019. [ONLINE ARTICLE] [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Mechanics of biomimetic 4D printed structures Wim M. van Rees, Elisabetta A. Matsumoto, A. Sydney Gladman, Jennifer A. Lewis and L. Mahadevan,  Soft Matter , 2018. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Biomimetic 4D printing A. S. Gladman, E. A. Matsumoto, R.G. Nuzzo, L. Mahadevan, and J.A. Lewis,  Nature Materials , 15, 413-19, 2016. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

This flat structure morphs into shape of a human face when temperature changes - Sep 2019

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New structural design could lead to self-deploying tents or adaptive robotic fins

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Morphogenesis one century after On Growth and Form  Thomas Lecuit and L. Mahadevan,  Development  144, 4197-4198, 2017. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Protein Clumping Best Blocked Using Specific Compounds at Distinct Disease Stages, Model Suggests - Aug 2019

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A mathematical model created to more effectively prevent protein clumping, widely thought to underlie diseases like Parkinson’s, found that different potential treatments work best at different disease stages

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Optimal strategies for inhibition of protein aggregation T.C. Michaels, C. Weber and L. Mahadevan, PNAS 116 (29) 14593-14598, 2019. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

How early-stage embryos maintain their size - Aug 2019

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Mechanical cues play critical role in shaping form and function

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Hydraulic control of mammalian embryo size and cell fate
C.J. Chan, M. Costanzo, T. Ruiz-Herrero, G. Monke, R. Petrie, L. Mahadevan, T. Hiiragi, Nature 571, 112–116, 2019. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Molecular control of macroscopic forces drives formation of the vertebrate hindgut N.L. Nerurkar, CH Lee, L. Mahadevan & C.J. Tabin, Nature 565, 2019. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Shape-shifting sheets - Aug 2019

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Mathematical framework turns any sheet of material into any shape using kirigami cuts

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Programming shape using kirigami tessellations G. P. T. Choi, L. H. Dudte and L. MahadevanNature Materials 18, 999–1004. 2019. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Using math to help treat Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other diseases - Jul 2019

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Insights into treatments for protein aggregation diseases from control theory and chemical kinetics

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Spatial control of irreversible protein aggregation
C. Weber, T.C. Michaels and L. Mahadevan, eLife 8:e42315, 2019. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Using origami memory to encode geometric information in floppy structures - Apr 2019

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Researchers develop method to control the rigidity of structures through origami folds

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Rigidity percolation and geometric information in floppy origami S. Chen, L. Mahadevan, PNAS 116 (17) 8119-8124, 2019. [ONLINE ARTICLE] [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Deterministic and stochastic control of kirigami topology Siheng Chen, Gary P. T. Choi, L. Mahadevan, PNAS (2020) 117 (9) 4511-4517. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

How termite mounds get their shape - Feb 2019

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Shedding light on the principles of termite mound size and shape with a model coupling insect behavior and environmental remodeling


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Morphogenesis of termite mounds S. A. Ocko , A. Heyde, and L. Mahadevan, PNAS 116(9) 3379-3384; published ahead of print February 11, 2019. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Shaking the swarm - Sep 2018

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Researchers explore how bees collaborate to stabilize swarm clusters


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Swarming, swirling and stasis in sequestered bristle-bots. L. Giomi, N. Hawley-Weld and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the Royal Society (A), (2012),  469, 20120637. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Collective mechanical adaptation of honeybee swarms O. Peleg, J. M. Peters, M. K. Salcedo and L. Mahadevan,  Nature Physics Letters , 2018. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

A photosynthetic engine for artificial cells - May 2018

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Researchers engineered a cell-like structure that harnesses photosynthesis to perform designer reactions

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Photosynthetic artificial organelles sustain and control ATP-dependent reactions in a protocellular system K. Y.Lee, S-J Park, K. A. Lee, S-H Kim, H. Kim, Y. Meroz, L Mahadevan, K-H Jung, T. K. Ahn, K. K. Parker & K. Shin,  Nature Biotechnology  36, 6, 2018. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Mimicking birdsongs - Aug 2017

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Researchers develop simple device to recreate complex birdsong


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Controllable biomimetic birdsong A. Mukherjee, S. Mandre and L. Mahadevan,  Journal Royal Society Interface  14: 20170002, 2017. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Cracking the Mystery of the Egg Shape - Jun 2017

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Not all eggs are shaped like a chicken’s—now we know why!

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Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution M.C. Stoddard, E.H. Yong, D. Akkaynak, C. Sheard, J.A. Tobias, L. Mahadevan,  Science  356, 1249-1254, 2017. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Evolution of avian egg shape: underlying mechanisms and the importance of taxonomic scale C. Sheard, D. Akkaynak, EH Yong, L. Mahadevan & J. A. Tobias, IBIS 161 (4) 15 July 2019. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

A stem’s ‘sense of self’ contributes to shape - Mar 2017

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Mathematical framework explains diverse plant stem forms


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On the growth and form of shoots R. Chelakkot and L. Mahadevan,  Journal of the Royal Society Interface , 14, 20170001, 2017. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

New research replicates the folding of a fetal human brain - Feb 2016

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The distinctive troughs and crests of the human brain are actually not present in most animal brains; highly folded brains are seen only in a handful of species, including some primates, dolphins, elephants and pigs. In humans, folding begins in fetal brains around the 20th week of gestation and is completed only when the child is about a year and a half.


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On the growth and form of cortical convolutions T. Tallinen, J.Y. Chung, F. Rousseau, N. Girard, J. Lefèvre, and L. Mahadevan,  Nature Physics , 12, 588-93, 2016. [DOI] [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Designing a pop-up future - Jan 2016

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​Simple origami fold may hold the key to designing pop-up furniture, medical devices and scientific tools

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Programming curvature using origami tessellations L.H. Dudte, E. Vouga, T. Tachi and L. Mahadevan,  Nature Materials , 15, 583-88, 2016. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

On Growth and Form: Geometry, Physics and Biology - Dec 2013

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Of the diversity of living form, Charles Darwin said, “It is enough to drive the sanest man mad.” A century and a half later, how can we quantify, understand and predict this variety? How might we control it? Motivated by biological observations on scales ranging from molecular to histological, L. Mahadevan will explain how a combination of biological and physical experiments, together with mathematical models and computations, begin to unravel the physical basis for morphogenesis. He will go on to explore how these pan-disciplinary problems enrich the origins of this topic, creating new questions in mathematics, physics and biology.


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Controlled growth and form of precipitating microsculptures C. N. Kaplan, W. L. Noorduin, L. Li, R. Sadza, L. Folkertsma, J. Aizenberg, L. Mahadevan,  Science  355, 1395-99, 2017. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

A cutting edge issue resolved - Dec 2012

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Planning to have roast turkey at Christmas? You’ll be glad to hear that physicists have revealed exactly how to carve it – using jelly and a fishing line.

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Slicing softly with shear E. Reyssat, T. Tallinen, M. Le Merrer, and L. Mahadevan,  Physical Review Letters , 109, 244301, 2012. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Biological Springs and Ratchets - Aug 2012

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Biological movements are brought about in various ways, and not all of these involve the action of motor proteins. Apart from motor proteins, biological movements can be brought about by components that act like springs and ratchets. Biological springs store potential energy in various protein filament conformations, while biological ratchets act by biasing random Brownian motion and turning it into directional polymerization.

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Power-limited contraction dynamics of Vorticella convallaria: an ultrafast biological spring A. Upadhyaya, M. Baraban, J. Wong, P. Matsudaira, A. van Oudenaarden and L. Mahadevan,  Biophysical Journal , 94, 265, 2008. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

How the lily blooms - Mar 2011

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From a mismatch in growth, a flower blooms

Physicists reveal forces at work in the blossoming of a lily.

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Growth, geometry and mechanics of the blooming lily H-Y. Liang and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 108, 5516-21, 2011. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Unfolding the sulcus - Mar 2011

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Folds on the surface of soft materials are shown to be a consequence of a nonlinear instability

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Unfolding the sulcus E. Hohlfeld and L. Mahadevan,  Physical Review Letters , 106, 105702, 2011. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Population dynamics of red blood cells - Jan 2011

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Higgins and Mahadevan analyzed data on red cells and derived an equation model of red-cell maturation and clearance. They observed that the threshold for clearance is lowered with iron-deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait and showed how their model can differentiate these two disorders.

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Physiological and pathological population dynamics of circulating human red blood cells J. Higgins and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 107, 20587-92, 2010. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Pressure-driven occlusive flow of a confined red blood cell T. Savin, M. M. Bandi and L. Mahadevan,  Soft Matter , 12, 562-573, 2015. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Statistical dynamics of flowing red blood cells by morphological image processing J. Higgins, D. Eddington, S. Bhatia and L. Mahadevan,  PLoS Computational Biology , 5, e1000288, 2009. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Shape of a long leaf - Nov 2009

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Cause behind the characteristic shape of a long leaf revealed

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The shape of a long leaf H. Liang and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) ,106, 22049, 2009. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

The ruck’s progress - Nov 2009

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What the ruck?—The physics of a bump in a rug
Not one, but two papers that examine the physics of a bump in a rug have …

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The shape and motion of a ruck in a rug J. Kolinski, P. Aussillous and L. Mahadevan,  Physical Review Letters , 103, 174302, 2009. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

MacArthur Fellowship Announcement - Sep 2009

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Applied Mathematician | Class of 2009

Investigating principles underlying the behavior of complex systems to address such accessible, but vexing, questions as how flags flutter, how skin wrinkles, how Venus flytraps snap closed.

Applied mathematician L. Mahadevan was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2009. The Fellowship is a $500,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

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Botanical ratchets - Jul 2009

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Seeds Are Nature’s Most Efficient Ratchet

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Botanical ratchets I. Kulic, M. Mani, H. Mohrbach, R. Thaokar, L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (B), Biological Sciences , 276, 2243-47, 2009. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Helical assemblies of bristles - Jan 2009

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Researchers control the assembly of nanobristles into helical clusters

 

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Self-organization of a mesoscale bristle into ordered hierarchical helical assemblies B. Pokroy, S. Kang, L. Mahadevan, and J. Aizenberg,  Science , 323, 237, 2009. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Crack patterns - Dec 2008

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Cracking the Giant’s Causeway: Solving a 300 year old geology problem using kitchen materials

 

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Crack street: the cycloidal wake of a cylinder ripping through a thin solid sheet,  Ghatak, A. and L. Mahadevan,  Physical Review Letters . 91, 215507, 2003. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Simple curiosities compel scientist - Oct 2008

L. Mahadevan smiled at the question, which was: “What, exactly, do you do?” It is, on the surface, a simple question, but for Mahadevan the answer could lead many places. Or, maybe, that’s the answer, that Mahadevan, a 43-year-old professor at Harvard, studies seemingly simple, everyday questions,  “I am a wanderer, … and too curious about too many things, …. “

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Mathematics and map folding/unfolding - Mar 2008

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If you’ve ever been lost, you’ve experienced the frustrations of folding up a map. L. Mahadevan, a professor of applied mathematics at Harvard University, has studied wrinkles and folds, and joins Noah Adams to talk about why it’s so difficult to get that roadmap back into your glove compartment.


The Physics of the Familiar - Mar 2008

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How paint dries, the way flags flutter, how Nature discovered origami, and other marvels of the physical world.

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The wrinkling in an elephant’s trunk and in billionth-of-a-meter nanotubes proceed from the same physical principles. The oscillations and flutters that agitate a piece of paper when you blow on it operate by mechanisms similar to those that caused an improperly designed bridge to tragically, and famously, collapse. Watch demonstrations by applied mathematician Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan, whose curiosity and analytical prowess combine to identify and then explain phenomena such as the vexing problem of folding up a map (to which nature has invented a brilliant solution).

Finding Physics in Everyday Objects from Harvard Magazine on Vimeo.


Flying carpets - Dec 2007

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Here’s a seasonal news story I just wrote for Nature, which will appear (in edited form) in the last issue of the year. I gather, incidentally, that the original text of the ‘Arabian Nights’ doesn’t specify that the carpet flies as such, but only that anyone who sits on it is transported instantly to other lands.

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Ignobel Prize Announcement - Aug 2007

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A theoretical study of the way skin, apple peel, and bedsheets wrinkle won Mahadevan “a share” of this year’s Ig Nobel Prize in Physics. He “celebrated” this with a ditty and an essay-let:

The Ignobility of Wrinkles

Wrinkle, wrinkle on my skin

How, I wonder, did you begin ?

By sagging, and swelling and shrinking too

While stretching and bending were mixed into a brew

Till ahah, a formula that fits on a pin

How infinitely familiar and yet how far from being understood our immediate environment is!   No one reminds us of this everyday more than children- and so I thank them all, and in particular, our own two, Kausalya and Aditya.

Wrinkle, wrinkle on my skin

Where, I wonder,  did I sin ?

Celebrated in art and drapery

Until ahah, pruned by  surgery

And then, just a has-been !

I am glad that this little piece of work has amused you, as it did us. I started looking at the problem of wrinkling a few years ago, noticing as you have, that these nuisances appear everywhere –  indeed you too will see more of them as you grow older, so you had better get used to them! I had obtained a simple mathematical formula for the size of wrinkles in various situations, and on talking with my former postdoctoral fellow, Enrique Cerda, found that he had independently obtained some of the same results. So we wrote a paper that is one of those cited generalizing these ideas. Later, with others, I explained how wrinkles appear in nanotubes, elephant trunks, and even the lithosphere, the skin of our planet – of course then we call them mountains.

This little problem serves, I think, to teach us how infinitely familiar and yet how far from being understood, our immediate environment is. No one reminds us of this everyday more than children – and so I thank them all, young and old!

Curiosity is what underlies science which is now even part of our culture as this part parody, part revue that is the Ignobel proves!  And like any other cultural activity, such as art and music, it can be and indeed it should be, unapologetically fun.  It is fun to figure out how things work, at any and all levels,  ignoring the artificial hierarchy on the supposed importance of the questions we ask – after all, Nature never imposes one!   A quote by the English lexicographer and man of letters, Samuel Johnson (1709-84) may be apt: “Vulgar and inactive minds confound familiarity with knowledge, and conceive themselves informed of the whole nature of things when they are shown their form or told their use.”

May we long continue the tradition of celebrating da mental fun in the mundane!

L. Mahadevan


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Wrinkling of a stretched elastic sheet, Cerda, E., K. Ravi-Chandar and L. Mahadevan,  Nature , 419, 579, 2002. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Physicists make ripples with their “magic carpet” - Aug 2007

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The “Cheerios” Effect - Dec 2005

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Cereal Science: Why Floating Objects Stick Together


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Elastic cheerios effect: Self-assembly of cylinders on a soft solid
A. Chakrabarti, L. Ryan, M. K. Chaudhury and L. Mahadevan,  Europhysics Letters , 112, 54001, 2015.  [View PDF] [Download PDF]
The ‘Cheerios Effect’ D. Vella and L. Mahadevan,  American Journal of Physics , 73, 817-825, 2005. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Self organized Origami - Aug 2005

Origami May Be an Art, but Nature Got There First


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International Herald Tribune – “Let’s go on asking why ?” - May 2005

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Flutter of a flag - Feb 2005

The flutter of a flag in a gentle breeze, or the flapping of a sail in a rough wind are commonplace and familiar observations of a rich class of problems involving the interaction of fluids and structures, of wide interest and importance in science and engineering. In a recent study, we studied the mechanism that leads to this instability using a combination of analysis and scaling that lead us to a relatively simple theory for the critical velocity for the onset of flutter and the frequency of flapping.

flag

Image courtesy of M. Argentina


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Fluid-flow induced flutter of a flag M. Argentina and L. Mahadevan,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA), 102, 1829-34, 2005. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Captured: how the flytrap snaps - Jan 2005

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The rapid closure of the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is one of the fastest motions (typically 100 ms) in the plant kingdom and led Darwin to describe the plant as “one of the most wonderful in the world.”


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How the Venus Flytrap snaps Y. Forterre, J. Skotheim, J. Dumais and L. Mahadevan,  Nature,  433, 421-25, 2005. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Fashion gets physical - Mar 2004

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Next time you are trapped inside a neon-lit changing room trying on a possible clothes purchase, you might think of calling a mathematician, rather than a sales assistant, to help work out why those trousers aren’t hanging just right. Researchers from Harvard University and the University of Santiago in Chile have begun to solve the equations governing the way in which fabric drapes, and hope that their work will help make shopping a little easier in the future.

 


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Elements of Draping Cerda, E., L. Mahadevan and J. Passini,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) , 101 (7), 1806-10, 2004. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Biomimetic Ratchets – of snails and snakes - Dec 2003

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Researchers from the University of Cambridge in England and Lehigh University have shown that it is possible to make a strip of hydrogel mimic the movements of a snail, inchworm, and snake.


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Biomimetic ratcheting motion of lubricated hydrogel filaments, Mahadevan, L., S. Daniel and M. Chaudhury,  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) , 101, 23-26, 2004. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Motility driven by macromolecular springs and ratchets, Mahadevan, L. and P. Matsudaira,  Science , 288, 95-99, 2000. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

New Wrinkle On Fighting Crow’s Feet - Mar 2003

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A new theory predicts the structure of wrinkles in thin sheets of any material and may offer ways of eliminating them.

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Superficial wrinkles in stretched, drying gelatin films R. Rizzieri, L. Mahadevan, A. Vaziri and A. Donald,  Langmuir , 22, 3622, 2006. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Aphids Marbles - Jul 2002

Insects provide examples of many cunning stratagems to cope with the challenges of living in a world dominated by surface forces. Despite being the current masters of the land environment, they are at constant risk of being entrapped in liquids, which they prevent by having waxy and hairy surfaces. The problem is particularly acute in an enclosed space, such as a plant gall. Using secreted wax to efficiently parcel and transport their own excrement, aphids were able to solve this problem 200 Myr ago. Here, we report on the physical and physiological significance of this ingenious solution. The secreted powdery wax has three distinct roles: (i) it is hydrophobic, (ii) it creates a microscopically rough inner gall surface made of weakly compacted wax needles making the gall ultra-hydrophobic, and (iii) it coats the honeydew droplets converting them into liquid marbles, that can be rapidly and efficiently moved.


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Collapsing Bubbles - Feb 2000

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When a bubble of air rises to the top of a highly viscous liquid, it forms a dome-shaped protuberance on the free surface. Unlike a soap bubble, it bursts so slowly as to collapse under its own weight simultaneously, and folds into a wavy structure. This rippling effect occurs for both elastic and viscous sheets, and a theory for its onset is formulated. The growth of the corrugation is governed by the competition between gravitational and bending (shearing) forces and is exhibited for a range of densities, stiffnesses (viscosities), and sizes—a result that arises less from dynamics than from geometry, suggesting a wide validity. A quantitative expression for the number of ripples is presented, together with experimental results that support the theoretical predictions.

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Non-spherical bubbles A. Balasubramaniam, M. Abkarian, L. Mahadevan and H.A. Stone,  Nature , 438, 930, 2005. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Crumpling - Sep 1999

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What do mountains, wrinkled slacks and a crushed soda can have in common? The answer: all have been crumpled

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Conical dislocations in crumpling Cerda, E., S. Chaieb, F. Melo and L. Mahadevan,  Nature , 401, 46-49, 1999. [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Tumbling Cards - Dec 1998

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When a stiff rectangular card is dropped in still air with its long axis horizontal, it often settles into a regular mode of motion; while revolving around its long axis it descends along a path that is inclined to the vertical at a nearly constant angle. We show experimentally that the tumbling frequency ΩΩ of a card of length l,l, width w and thickness d (l≫w≫d)(l≫w≫d) scales as Ω∼d1/2w−1,Ω∼d1/2w−1, consistent with a simple dimensional argument that balances the drag against gravity.

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Tumbling cards Mahadevan, L., W. Ryu, and A.D.T. Samuel,  Physics of Fluids , 11, 1-3, 1999. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Tumbling of a falling card Mahadevan, L. Comptes Rendus de l’Academie des Sciences, Paris, Series II , 323, 729-736, 1996.
Flip-flop-induced relaxation of bending energy: implications for membrane remodeling R. Bruckner, S. Mansy, A. Ricardo, L. Mahadevan, and J. Szostak,  Biophysical Journal , 97, 3113, 2009 [View PDF] [Download PDF]

Fluid Rope Tricks - Mar 1998

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Buckling instabilities can arise from competition between axial compression and bending in slender objects. These are not restricted to solids, but also occur with fluids with free surfaces1,4, in geophysics5 and in materials processing6. Here we consider a classic demonstration of fluid buckling7.


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Physicists Study the Honeybee For Clues to Complex Problems

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Fluid rope trick investigated Mahadevan, L., W. Ryu, and A.D.T. Samuel,  Nature391, 140, 1998. Corrigendum; ibid., 403, 502, 2000. [View PDF] [Download PDF]
Fluid-driven fingering instability of a confined elastic meniscus J.S. Biggins, Z. Wei and L. Mahadevan,  Europhysics Letters , 110, 34001, 2015. [View PDF] [Download PDF]